Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Delivery of the Mechanized Raid Force to a Launch Point.

The Marine Corps doesn't need to re-invent the world.

All it needs to do is to tap into the institutional knowledge already present and shape the future with what equipment we already have.

It means getting back to our roots of doing more with less.

The main issue is this.  If AAV's, the future ACV or the MPC can't launch from over the horizon then how do we get them to a point where they can swim ashore?

The Navy/Marine Corps team has already figured it out.  You launch your LCAC's from over the horizon, you reach a designated point and then you launch your vehicles from the LCAC so that they can swim onto the beach.

Utilizing this one technique that has already been tested and is part of our playbook can solve the ship to shore problem quite nicely.  We'll still need a good swimming vehicle but it won't necessarily have to be burdened to also be a high speed swimmer too.

I highly recommend that everyone read the "LCAC Manual" here...

Note:  Yes I know I've already written about this technique, but it bears repeating.  Additionally I have found no images or video of this actually being tested, if you find some send it my way.  

4 comments:

  1. Excellent point.
    I'm still not convinced you wouldnt be better off giving up the amphib side and just beaching the LCs, but its a very good half way point.

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  2. i like the idea and i'm kicking myself for not pushing it harder. this is a concept that should have been experimented with during Bold Alligator. one thing though. the Marine Corps is and should always remain amphibious in nature. any change to that means that the Marine Corps is substantially different than it has always been.

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  3. Sorry that was a bit unclear.
    I'd keep the "amphibious nature" but I'd express it with swimming tank carriers, rather than swimming tanks.

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    Replies
    1. not being argumentative but isn't that exactly what an LCAC is?

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